Sequencing Objectives


Chronological Sequencing
Chronology comes from the Greek word chronos, meaning time. Therefore, chronological sequencing is sequencing that occurs over time.

Example:

Topical Sequencing
Performance objectives are sequenced by topic. For example, say you were creating a course for a new machine. You might want to cover: How to Operate the Machine, How to Maintain the Machine, Safety Precautions, et cetera.

Example:

Whole-to-Part Sequencing
With whole-to-part sequencing, you want to give learners the BIG picture of the topic you are teaching, and then "specialize" in the specifics. For example, if you wanted to talk about starters on an engine, you would want to review the major parts of an engine and what they do. Then you could zero in on the starter and talk about it in depth. This sequencing strategy works well for people who are new to a subject or subject area.

Example:

Part-to-Whole Sequencing
Part-to-Whole sequencing, on the other hand, works well with experienced learners. If you were teaching the specifics of a new starter, you would start with the specifics first, then talk about the various types of engines on which the starter could be used.

Example:

Known-to-Unknown Sequencing
Experienced teachers and trainers have long advised new teachers and trainers to find out what your students know, then start teaching from what they know. It is the logic that underlies the concept of pre-testing.

Example:

Unknown-to-Known Sequencing
This is a dramatic strategy that should be used with caution. Used correctly, trainees will experience an Ah-Ha! experience when they suddenly see how various pieces of information fit together. Be careful. If there is no Ah-Ha realization, trainees will leave your training room confused and frustrated.

Example:

Step-by-Step Sequencing
Perhaps the most common strategy for sequencing performance objectives, because it is often based upon a manufacturing or assembly process.

Example:

Part-to-Part-to-Part Sequencing
Think back to high school. Chances are you had four years of english, math, history / social studies, and science. Each year, the courses built on the previous year and were progressively harder. What you went through was Part-to-Part-to-Part Sequencing.

Example:

General-to-Specific Sequencing
Now think back to college. During your first two years, you spent most of your time taking required courses. It was only in your Junior and Senior years were you able to work on your major, take some courses for a minor, and fill out the rest of your program with electives.

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